RUS | ENG

Supported by:

Siberian developer tests artificial intelligence for medical use

A clinic in Siberia’s Novosibirsk is launching a series of tests for a new system called iMedica, designed to help physicians make decisions.

Dec 27, 2014
A clinic in Siberia’s Novosibirsk is launching a series of tests for a new system called iMedica, designed to help physicians make decisions. This is said to be Russia’s first and the world’s second project that uses artificial intelligence in medicine.

The system comprises data on diseases and accompanying symptoms, based on which it is said to be able to generate a list of most likely diagnoses, drawing upon information from a reported 22 million scientific articles on medical issues, and also upon clinical practice. The system also contains reference information that is expected to help a physician choose tests and therapies for a specific patient.

iMedica doesn’t require that a long list of a patient’s personal data be entered; indicating one’s sex, age, complaints, checkup results, risk factors from patient's medical history, and lab test and analysis results is enough. When necessary, the system initiates a dialog with a user physician to recommend that the doctor get from his patient answers to some additional questions.

It is expected that the new service will make diagnosing faster and more accurate as it takes into account global medical statistics. Its database is said to be self-learning, and will allow the entry of clinical experience gained in a specific medical facility.

In fact, the system impersonates the work of a physician at a patient’s first visit. The iMedica developers are reported to have come up with algorithms for diagnosing 245 diseases by analyzing 2,000 symptoms. They hope to complete the initial phase of testing by the end of this year and extend the list of diseases to 3,500 and that of symptoms to something between 5,000 and 6,000. The Siberians are currently developing versions for general practitioners, psychiatrists, infectious disease specialists, and ambulance teams.