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Visa, work permits Q&A. Part V

I came to Russia with a multientry one-year visa, rented a private apartment but the people from OVIR say that they can only register my visa for six months. Are they right?

By Jon Hellivig, The Russia Journal
Sep 26, 2003
I came to Russia with a multientry one-year visa, rented a private apartment, and, now, I need registration of my visa for one year. I have my landlord's permission to stay in the apartment for one year. But the people from OVIR say that they can only register my visa for six months. Are they right?

Yes, they are right. When registering a visa, you should give your passport and certain documents for apartment where you live to OVIR, either the tenancy agreement or a landlord's permission for you to stay in the apartment. In case you give a tenancy agreement to OVIR, your visa will be registered for the term of the agreement's validity. In case you give a landlord's permission for your stay in the apartment to OVIR, your visa will be registered for a period of not more than six months. Please note that OVIR requires a notarized copy of the aforesaid landlord's permission.

I'm a foreign citizen and general director of a limited-liability company in Russia. I do not have a work permit, and I do not think I need one, because I am always abroad and do not actually work in Russia. But one of our clients said that he wouldn't sign any contracts because I do not have a work permit and cannot sign documents on behalf of our company. This doesn't sound right to me.

You are the general director, and this position requires making important decisions and signing documents on behalf of the company. This means that you work for the company, even if you are not present in it physically. According to the law, no one can work in Russia without a work permit, even if this person is always abroad. In this case, if you do not have a work permit you cannot sign documents on behalf of the company. If you do, they can be considered void.